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Discussion Starter #1
I’ve searched and found enough information to determine that there’s no way to replace the turn signal flasher (right?), so that leaves installing resistors if.LED bulbs are installed in the turn signal sockets. Both the 7440 and PW24W appear to be 25-watt bulbs, so a 6-ohm resistor should mimic it. However, if a higher*value. Resistor can be used and still eliminate the hyper-flash, I’d like to do that. Has anyone experimented with the 10- and 15-ohm resisters that are out there?
 

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I take it you are trying to replace the non-LED turn signal bulbs with LED bulbs? There are repalcement LED bulbs on eBay for under $15 per pair.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yes, I intend to install LED bulbs in place of the OEM incandescent ones. This typically results in "hyperflashing," which is resolved by changing the stock thermal flasher module to an electronic one, or, if this isn't possible (which I believe is the case with the TLX), installation of resistors across each bulb to mimic the load of the incandescent bulb.

I believe resistors are necessary in our case, and I want to use the highest value that with result in normal flashing. This will give the lowest current, and the least heat generated.
 

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Let us know what you end up with.
FWIW: I have no idea what resistance value you should use!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Following up on this for others who may search:

Resisters are, indeed, needed in parallel with LED turn-signal bulbs, even ones that are supposed to be "error free."

10-Ohm , 25-Watt-rated resistors worked fine. They still get über hot after awhile, but not as bad, I'm sure, as the "standard" 6-ohm ones would. With the 10-Ohm resistors plus LED bulbs, total current is around 18 watts (14 + 4) instead of the incandescent bulb's 24-watt draw.

I didn't think to check if two in series (20-Ohms) would work, but that would net only about 11 watts when the bulb-out circuit is expecting a load of 24 watts. Who knows? It might have been fine, and drawn even less current (and run even cooler) as a result. SOmeone else will have to test that, though. :)

P.S. LED bulbs in the reverse lamp housings work fine as-is, and have not generated an error.
 
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